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cover: Freeze Frame (2004)

Freeze Frame (2004)

Director(s): John Simpson

Theatrical Release: 2004

Cast: Lee Evans, Sean McGinley, Ian McNeice, Colin Salmon, Rachael Stirling, Rachel O'Riordan

Genre(s): Thriller, psychological, Dean's List

Countries: Ireland, United Kingdom


Location in store: United Kingdom / Irish Cinema

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Running Time: 95m.

They say that just because you're paranoid it doesn't mean someone isn't really out to get you, and a man learns the truth behind that little joke in this British thriller. Sean Veil (Lee Evans) was accused of the gruesome murder of a woman and her two children on the basis of circumstantial evidence, and when the case gained nationwide media attention, he found himself portrayed as a violent psychopath in the press, even though he was cleared of all charges. The constant scrutiny and bitter accusations had a profound effect on Veil, and now, deeply paranoid, he lives in a tiny basement apartment, where he obsessively videotapes his every move in order to have an alibi against future accusations, and even straps a camera to his chest whenever he ventures outside. When noted forensic pathologist Saul Seger (Ian McNeice) publishes a book about the murders, Veil finds himself back in the public eye, and vindictive police detective Emeric (Sean McGinley) decides to take a final stab at hanging the charges on Veil and making them stick. Veil becomes certain that someone is determined to put him away, a belief that gets stronger when parts of his video archive suddenly go missing. Freeze Frame was the first feature film from writer and director John Simpson. Mark Deming (allmovie.com)
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