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Band of Brothers (2001) d3/6

Director(s): Tom Hanks / David Leland

Theatrical Release: 2001

Cast: Damian Lewis, Donnie Wahlberg, Ron Livingston, Neal McDonough, Shane Taylor, Stephen McCole

Genre(s): Drama, docudrama, biography, Action, war, Dean's List

Countries: USA


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Crossroads - Part Five of HBO's groundbreaking WWII docudrama miniseries, Band of Brothers, was directed by executive producer Tom Hanks. In this episode, "Crossroads," Colonel Sink (series technical advisor Dale Dye) promotes Captain Winters (Damian Lewis) to Battalion Executive Officer. While Easy Company, under the command of Lieutenant "Moose" Heyliger (Stephen McCole of Rushmore), rescues a large group of British soldiers who are in hiding after getting trapped behind enemy lines during Operation Market Garden, Winters sits behind a desk, typing out a report of the company's previous encounter with the Germans. Winters, at the insistence of his friend, intelligence officer Lieutenant Nixon (Ron Livingston), takes leave and travels to Paris, but he's too distracted by his memories of combat -- in particular his shooting of one young German soldier -- to enjoy his trip. Upon his return to battalion headquarters, he has a brief encounter with the injured Sergeant "Buck" Compton (Neal McDonough), who also seems haunted by his battle experience. Then, Winters joins the company as they race to the front, where they meet other Allied forces, retreating from a vicious German counterattack in the Ardennes Forest. Here, Easy Company, ill-equipped to deal with the cold weather and short on rations and ammo, is charged with helping defend the strategic crossroads of Bastogne from German attack. Viewers may spot Jimmy Fallon of Saturday Night Live, who makes a brief appearance as a lieutenant dropping off some ammo for the company. (allmovie.com)

Bastogne - The sixth installment of HBO's WWII docudrama miniseries Band of Brothers, "Bastogne," which is shown primarily from the point of view of Easy Company's soft-spoken, dedicated medic, Eugene Roe (Shane Taylor), deals with the company's involvement in the Battle of the Bulge. Due to poor weather and heavy fog, the American forces are unable to drop supplies to the line protecting Bastogne, Belgium. With the company short on medical supplies, food, and warm clothing, Roe has his hands full. In addition to treating the wounded with limited resources, he has to keep everyone aware of the health dangers posed by the extreme weather conditions. He spends much of his time trying to find basic supplies like morphine, and reminding the men to move around and stay dry to avoid trench foot. A squad of soldiers on patrol, looking for Germans, runs into the enemy line, and Babe Heffron (Robin Laing) becomes distraught when a young soldier he was looking after is mortally wounded and has to be left behind as the squad retreats. When Roe leaves the woods where the company is stationed and goes into the town of Bastogne to try to scrounge up supplies, he meets a pretty young Belgian nurse, Renee (Lucie Jeanne), who is doing her best to treat wounded American soldiers in a makeshift triage station. Roe, being half-Cajun, speaks French, and during their brief interaction, the two develop a quiet rapport. But soon he returns to the line, and as the Germans advance and casualties mount, he becomes overwhelmed and seems on the verge of breaking down. Captain Winters (Damian Lewis) notices Roe's shakiness, and sends him back into Bastogne for a hot meal, but when the young medic arrives in the town, he finds that it is being bombarded by the Germans. (allmovie.com)
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